Sinus Infection Treatment That Works Better Than Antibiotics


*Sniff, sniff…* is the sound of congested and infected nasal sinuses. Sinus infections causing frequent irritation, itching, and pain are being greatly reduced with the use of baby shampoo sinus irrigation and probiotic nasal rinses.

Antibiotics are commonly used to treat sinus infections, but may cause more harm than help by riding of the bad and good bacteria in the nasal cavity. Also, antibiotics cause many other side effects such as diarrhea, nausea, and allergic reaction.


New breakthroughs in medicine are proving that baby shampoo irrigation helps to loosen oily build-up in the nasal sinus cavity. Much of the oily build-up includes harmful bacteria. The “surfactant” in baby shampoo is helpful in loosening the bacteria from the nasal sinuses.

Why should you irrigate the nasal sinuses? The nose is a filter for air which reaches the lungs. It is important to have a clean and clear airway to promote adequate oxygenation and breathing. Healthy sinuses allow for healthy ventilation. Inflamed sinuses decrease air flow, produce excess mucous, and disrupt the tissue of the nostrils and lungs. Taking care of the nasal sinuses is vital to the well-being of the rest of the body. The key to maintaining healthy nasal sinuses is to regularly irrigate them to rid of excess oil, debris, drainage, and bacteria. Below are instructions for mixing your own nasal irrigation system, how to use it, and the possibility of using a probiotic solution to replenish nasal bacteria.

Hot To Use Baby Shampoo Irrigation
Ingredients/Supplies: Three teaspoons of salt, one teaspoon of baking soda, plastic bag, half teaspoon of baby shampoo, eight ounces (one cup) of lukewarm distilled water, bulb syringe, kleenex, basin (optional).

First, the saline must be made. This may be done by mixing three teaspoons of salt with one teaspoon of baking soda. This may be stored in a plastic “Ziplock” baggy.

Secondly, mix one teaspoon of the saline and a half teaspoon of baby shampoo with eight ounces, or one cup, of lukewarm distilled water.

Thirdly, use a bulb syringe to draw up the solution. Tilt your head downward into the sink or tub. Gently insert the bulb syringe into the nostrils (one at a time), approximately one inch, to irrigate. Only squeeze the bulb syringe half-way for each nostril. You will notice solution coming out of the other nostril as you instill the solution – this is normal. Blow each nose very gently to remove excess fluid. It is possible to feel the solution in your ears. This is normal and the discomfort should resolve shortly.


Using Probiotic Nasal Irrigations:

Bacteria is a necessity in the human body. Probiotics are used to replenish “good” bacteria, which help to fight off the “bad” bacteria. Some of the bad bacteria commonly found in the nasal sinuses include “Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis.” In current research, probiotics are being clinically tested to reduce and/or eliminate the presence of these bacteria. Usually, probiotics are supplied in capsule or powder form.

If they are in capsule form, break open the capsule and mix it in with the solution (from above). If the probiotic is in powder form, use a teaspoon of the powder, or the suggested dosage, and add it to the solution to instill in the nostril. Follow the same procedure as stated above. As always, be sure to GENTLY blow each nostril into a tissue to rid of the excess fluid.

IMPORTANT- PLEASE NOTE: If you are currently using nasal medications, wait 30 minutes before and after irrigating to use the medications in the nostrils. Speak with your physician and stop use if you experience pain, bleeding or irritation. Before using irrigation be sure to speak with your physician to ensure this is a productive treatment plan for you. Frequent sinus infections may have differing underlying causes.